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USDA International Meat Review


17 April 2015

USDA International Meat Review - 17 April 2015USDA International Meat Review - 17 April 2015


USDA International Meat Review

Trade Highlights

According to data from the USDA Livestock, Poultry and Grain Market News (LPGMN), during the first quarter of 2015, the U.S. imported 297,036 head of feeder cattle from Mexico. This was 13.5 percent more than one year ago and was slightly lower than two years ago. During the same time frame, feeder cattle imports from Canada totaled 143,006 head, which was 12.7 percent greater than a year ago. Imports of slaughter steers and heifers from Canada were down 43.8 percent from last year, amounting to 60,067 head. U.S. feeder pig imports from Canada during the first quarter of 2015 were up 3.9 percent from a year ago, totaling 981,322 head. Total slaughter hog imports from Canada equaled 164,973 head, which was 105.6 percent above a year ago. To obtain the weekly reports, visit the LPGMN website at http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/LPSMarketNewsPage.

North America

CanFax recently published Canada’s 2014 Annual Report. According to the report, as of January 1, 2015, total cattle inventory was 11.92 million head. This was the lowest inventory since 1993. According to CanFax, this is due to aggressive live cattle exports and sending cattle to market in 2014. Also, CanFax published Canada’s 2014 feedlot demographic survey results. According to the report, as of January 1, 2015, the total number of feedlots in Alberta and Saskatchewan was 150, down from 157 a year ago. This is the lowest Alberta/Saskatchewan capacity since reporting began in 2000. Furthermore, total feedlot capacity has declined for seven consecutive years. Alberta saw a decrease in the total number of feedlots from 151 in 2014 to 143 in 2015 amounting to 28,000 head less capacity than last year. Saskatchewan saw an increase in the total number of feedlots of seven, up from six a year ago equaling 3,500 head more capacity than last year. The total bunk capacity in the two provinces was 1,419,200 head, down 1.7 percent from 2014. More specifically, 1,000-5,000 head capacity totaled 70 feedlots, down from 76 feedlots last year. This change indicated feeding practices had changed from finishing to primarily backgrounding. Capacity of 5,001-10,000 equaled 40 feedlots, which was up from 38 in 2014. Feedlots with capacity of 10,001 and over decreased to 40 from 43 compared to last year. For the complete report, go to the CanFax website at http://www.canfax.ca/.

Pacific Rim

Japan’s Agriculture and Livestock Industries Corporation (ALIC) recently issued Japan’s red meat import data for February 2015. According to the data, Japan’s beef imports during February rose 7.0 percent over the previous month but fell 1.1 percent from February 2014 to 35,393 MT. Specifically, frozen beef imports equaled 22,005 MT, which was up 8.4 percent over the previous month and was up 5.2 percent over February 2014. Fresh, chilled beef imports equaled 13,338 MT, which was up 4.7 percent over the previous month but was down 9.9 percent from February 2014. Beef imports from Australia during February totaled 16,899 MT. This was unchanged from January but was 14.1 percent less than February 2014. Year-to-date beef imports from Australia were 10.4 percent below last year, totaling 33,798 MT. Australia was the leading provider of beef to Japan with 47.7 percent of that total imports. During February, Japan imported 13,379 MT of beef from the U.S. This was 17.8 percent higher than the previous month and was 5.7 percent higher than February 2014. Total year-to-date beef imports from the U.S. equaled 24,741 MT, 2.1 percent lower than a year ago. Japan’s beef imports from New Zealand during February fell 36.0 percent from the previous month to 1,473 MT. Also, this was 37.1 percent less than February 2014. Year-to-date beef imports from New Zealand were down 10.9 percent from last year, amounting to 3,774 MT. Overall, Japan’s total year-to-date beef imports equaled 68,462 MT, which was 1.4 percent below the same period a year ago. Japan’s beef marketings during January totaled 59,424 MT, which was 16.9 percent less than the previous month and was 5.1 percent less than a year ago. Marketings of imported beef were down 8.4 percent from last year, equaling 32,557 MT. Domestic beef marketings totaled 26,685 MT, which was 1.3 percent lower than a year ago. At the end of January, Japan’s beef stocks totaled 131,982 MT. This was nearly unchanged from the previous month but was up 11.1 percent over a year ago. Stocks of imported beef equaled 121,862 MT, 14.4 percent more than last year. Stocks of domestic beef were down 17.5 percent from a year ago, amounting to 10,120 MT.

Japan’s pork imports during February were nearly unchanged from January but fell 5.6 percent from February 2014 to 53,963 MT. More specifically, frozen pork imports totaled 33,384 MT, which was down 4.3 percent from the previous month but was up 7.2 percent from February 2014. Conversely, fresh, chilled pork imports were up 8.2 percent over the previous month but were down 20.9 percent from February 2014, totaling 20,579 MT. Japan’s pork imports from the U.S. during February equaled 19,570 MT. This was 27.0 percent more than the previous month but was 9.0 percent less than February 2014. Total year-to-date pork imports from the U.S. were 19.3 percent below last year, amounting to 34,985 MT. The U.S. was the largest supplier of pork to Japan with 36.3 percent of the total imports. During February, Japan imported 9,445 MT of pork from Canada. This was down 13.0 percent from the previous month and was down 23.0 percent from February 2014. Year-to-date pork imports from Canada totaled 20,304 MT, 15.4 percent lower than a year ago. Pork imports from Denmark during February fell 4.6 percent from the previous month to 7,280 MT. Also, this was down 8.9 percent from February 2014. Year-to-date pork imports from Denmark were 29.5 percent lower than last year, totaling 14,908 MT. Overall, Japan’s total year-to-date pork imports equaled 107,894 MT, 12.9 percent less than the corresponding period a year ago. Japan’s pork marketings during January fell 12.0 percent from the previous month to 132,716 MT. This was down slightly from a year ago. Imported pork marketings totaled 55,184 MT, which was 7.5 percent higher than a year ago. Marketings of domestic pork were 5.4 percent lower than last year, totaling 77,532 MT. At the end of January, Japan’s pork stocks totaled 184,648 MT, which was 2.3 percent lower than the previous month but was 12.5 percent higher than a year ago. Stocks of imported pork equaled 167,825 MT, 16.9 percent more than last year. Stocks of domestic pork equaled 16,823 MT, which was 18.0 percent below a year ago. Additional data on Japan’s red meat trade can be found on the ALIC website at http://lin.alic.go.jp/alic/statis/dome/data2/e_nstatis.htm.

Oceania

Recently, the Economic Service of Beef + Lamb New Zealand (B+LNZ) released its Export Statistics for the first half of the 2014-15 season. According to the data, from October 2014 to March 2015, New Zealand had record high returns on beef due to strong demand and a weaker New Zealand dollar against the U.S. dollar. Beef and veal exports for the first six months of 2014-15 equaled 212,100 MT, which was 11.9 percent higher than a year ago. According to the data, this was due to strong global demand for beef and consistent high monthly exports to two main market, the U.S. and China. Lamb exports decreased by 2.9 percent from the same period last season to 153,687 MT. Conversely, the total value of lamb exports rose slightly. Mutton exports for the first half of the season totaled 50,983 MT, 17.4 percent less than the 2013-14 season when New Zealand experienced higher production levels due to dry conditions. To obtain the complete report, visit the B+LNZ website at http://www.beeflambnz.com/.

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