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Salmonella


Information and images from the Health Protection Agency, UK, and the Centers for Disease Control, USA

Salmonella bacteria cause food poisioning, typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever. More than 2500 different strains of salmonella have been identified.

Anyone can get salmonella, but young children, the elderly and people whose immune systems are not working properly have a greater risk of becoming severely ill.

Symptoms include watery diarrhoea, stomach cramps and sometimes vomiting and fever. These symptoms usually last for four to seven days and clear up without treatment, but if you become seriously ill you may need to be treated for dehydration (fluid loss) caused by the illness.

Transmission occurs by eating contaminated food, mainly of animal origin, or by faecal contamination from an infected person or animal.

Clinical Information

Incubation period:
12 to 72 hours.

Common clinical features:
Diarrhoea, vomiting and fever.

Reservoir:
Gastrointestinal tract of wild and domestic animals, birds (especially poultry), reptiles, amphibians (for example terrapins), and occasionally humans.

Transmission:
Predominantly from foodstuffs (most commonly red and white meats, raw eggs, milk, and dairy products) following contamination of cooked food by raw food or failing to achieve adequate cooking temperatures. Person to person spread from a case by close contact, usually during the acute diarrhoeal phase of the illness. Contact with infected animals.

Secondary cases are common in outbreaks. Food handlers who practice good hygiene are very rarely responsible for initiating outbreaks.


Information and images from the Health Protection Agency, UK, and the Centers for Disease Control, USA

Salmonella bacteria cause food poisioning, typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever. More than 2500 different strains of salmonella have been identified.

Anyone can get salmonella, but young children, the elderly and people whose immune systems are not working properly have a greater risk of becoming severely ill.

Symptoms include watery diarrhoea, stomach cramps and sometimes vomiting and fever. These symptoms usually last for four to seven days and clear up without treatment, but if you become seriously ill you may need to be treated for dehydration (fluid loss) caused by the illness.

Transmission occurs by eating contaminated food, mainly of animal origin, or by faecal contamination from an infected person or animal.

Clinical Information

Incubation period:
12 to 72 hours.

Common clinical features:
Diarrhoea, vomiting and fever.

Reservoir:
Gastrointestinal tract of wild and domestic animals, birds (especially poultry), reptiles, amphibians (for example terrapins), and occasionally humans.

Transmission:
Predominantly from foodstuffs (most commonly red and white meats, raw eggs, milk, and dairy products) following contamination of cooked food by raw food or failing to achieve adequate cooking temperatures. Person to person spread from a case by close contact, usually during the acute diarrhoeal phase of the illness. Contact with infected animals.

Secondary cases are common in outbreaks. Food handlers who practice good hygiene are very rarely responsible for initiating outbreaks.

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