TheMeatSite.com - TheMeatSite.com - news, features and articles for the meat processing industry

Featured Articles

International Meat Review - 1 April 2010

09 April 2010

The US inventory of all hogs and pigs was 63.99 million head, according to the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS)quarterly Hogs and Pigs report, the latest International Meat Review says.

North America

This was 2.0 percent lower than the previous quarter and was 2.8 percent lower than a year ago. The U.S. breeding herd declined 1.5 percent from the previous quarter to 5.76 million head. Also, this was 3.9 percent less than a year ago. The number of market hogs and pigs equaled 58.23 million head, which was 2.1 percent less than the previous quarter and was 2.7 percent less than a year ago. More specifically, market hogs and pigs weighing less than 50 pounds totaled 19.02 million head, which was a little lower than the previous quarter and was 4.0 percent lower than a year ago. Market hogs and pigs weighing 50 to 119 pounds numbered 15.99 million head, which was 6.3 percent less than the previous quarter and was 2.6 percent less than a year ago. The number of market hogs and pigs weighing 120 to 179 pounds increased 3.3 percent over the previous quarter to 12.48 million head. However, this was down 2.0 percent from a year ago. Finally, the number of market hogs and pigs weighing more than 180 pounds were down 6.8 percent from the previous quarter and were down 1.1 percent from a year ago, amounting to 10.74 million head. During the December to February period, the number of sows farrowed totaled 2.90 million head. This was down 3.7 percent from a year ago and comprised 50.4 percent of the total breeding herd.

During the same time period, the pig crop totaled 27.87 million head, 2.4 percent less than a year ago. Pigs per liter equaled 9.61 head, compared to 9.48 a year ago. Iowa was the largest hog producing state with 18.90 million head of hogs. This was 3.1 percent less than a year ago and accounted for 29.5 percent of the total U.S. herd. North Carolina had the second largest hog inventory with 9.10 million head. This was down 3.2 percent from a year ago and accounted for 14.2 percent of the total U.S. herd. The total number of hogs under contract owned by operations with over 5,000 head comprised 44 percent of the total U.S. hog inventory, down from 45 percent last year. The complete report is available on the NASS website at http://www.nass.usda.gov/.

On March 19, USDA NASS published its monthly Cattle on Feed report. According to the data, cattle and calves on feed for the U.S. slaughter market for feedlots with a capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 10.86 million head on March 1, 2010. This was down 3.2 percent from one year ago and was down 8.3 percent from two years ago. Cattle placed on feed during February equaled 1.67 million head, which was a little lower than one year ago and was 3.4 percent lower than two years ago. More specifically, placements of feeder cattle weighing less than 600 pounds were unchanged from last year, amounting to 320,000 head. Placements of feeders weighing 600 to 699 pounds totaled 365,000 head, 5.2 percent less than last year. Placements weighing 700 to 799 pounds were down 3.3 percent from a year ago, totaling 520,000 head. Placements of feeder cattle weighing more than 800 pounds equaled 460,000 head, which was up 5.7 percent over a year ago. In the meantime, fed cattle marketings during February increased 2.1 percent over one year ago to 1.72 million head. However, this was 3.3 percent less than two years ago. To obtain the complete report, visit the NASS website at http://www.nass.usda.gov/.

On March 26, USDA NASS released its report, Price Reactions After USDA Livestock Reports. The report contains price reactions to USDA’s Cattle on Feed and Quarterly Hogs and Pigs reports. The report is available at the NASS website at http://www.nass.usda.gov/.

According to recent data from U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), an agency in the Department of Homeland Security, as of March 22, 2010, U.S. beef imports subject to a tariff rate quota (TRQ) totaled 125,699 MT. This was 17.9 percent less than the same period a year ago. U.S. imports of beef from Canada, which do not fall under a TRQ, equaled 53,709 MT. This was 1.1 percent lower than a year ago. Beef imports from Australia were 42.2 percent less than last year, amounting to 26,790 MT. This filled 7.1 percent of Australia’s TRQ, compared to 12.3 percent a year ago. Imports of beef from New Zealand through March 22 totaled 29,060 MT, 21.9 percent lower than a year ago. This filled 13.6 percent of the country’s TRQ, down from 17.4 percent filled a year ago. Both Australia and New Zealand are facing lower slaughter and production levels as producers are expected to increase cattle herds. Beef imports from Uruguay were down 56.5 percent from last year, amounting to 2,040 MT. This filled 10.2 percent of Uruguay’s TRQ, compared to 23.4 percent a year ago. Beef imports remained banned from Argentina. The weekly reports can be found on the CBP website at http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/trade/trade_programs/textiles_and_quotas/commodity/

Pacific Rim

Japan’s Ministry of Finance recently issued Japan’s red meat import data for December 2009 and for the year-end, as reported by Agriculture and Livestock Industries Corporation (ALIC). According to the numbers, during December, Japan imported 42,720 MT of beef. This was 25.3 percent higher than the previous month and was 14.4 percent higher than December 2008. Specifically, frozen beef imports totaled 25,629 MT, which was up 60.2 percent over the previous month and was up 32.2 percent over December 2008. Fresh, chilled beef imports totaled 17,056 MT, which was down 5.4 percent from the previous month and was down 4.6 percent from December 2008. During 2009, Japan’s total frozen beef imports equaled 268,409 MT; while fresh, chilled beef imports equaled 212,718 MT. During December, Japan’s beef imports from Australia rose 18.5 percent over the previous month to 31,163 MT. Also, this was 6.9 percent more than December 2008. During 2009, Japan imported 364,309 MT of beef from Australia, which was up 1.6 percent over 2008. Australia was the largest provider of beef to Japan with 75.6 percent of the total imports. Beef imports from the U.S. during December equaled 6,414 MT. This was 23.7 percent higher than the previous month and was 32.8 percent higher than December 2008. Japan’s beef imports from the U.S. during 2009 were 27.9 percent above 2008, totaling 69,192 MT. During 2009, Japan imported 29,564 MT of beef from New Zealand, which was 4.0 percent less than 2008. Overall, Japan’s total beef imports during 2009 equaled 481,589 MT, which was 5.0 percent more than 2008. During December, Japan’s beef marketings totaled 82,924 MT, which was 23.8 percent higher than the previous month and was 8.0 percent higher than a year ago. Marketings of imported beef equaled 47,770 MT, 19.8 percent more than a year ago. Marketings of domestic beef equaled 35,154 MT, 4.8 percent less than a year ago. Japan’s beef stocks at the end of December equaled 85,244 MT. This was 4.1 percent less than the previous month but was 2.8 percent more than a year ago. Imported beef stocks were up 4.3 percent over a year ago, amounting to 71,710 MT. Domestic beef stocks were 4.7 percent less than a year ago, totaling 13,534 MT.

During December, Japan imported 61,362 MT of pork. This was up 17.3 percent over the previous month but was down 10.0 percent from December 2008. More specifically, imports of frozen pork totaled 42,661 MT, which was 20.7 percent higher than the previous month but was 9.6 percent lower than December 2008. Similarly, imports of fresh, chilled pork totaled 18,698 MT, which was 10.3 percent higher than the previous month but was 10.8 percent lower than December 2008. During 2009, Japan’s frozen pork imports totaled 468,777 MT; while fresh, chilled pork imports totaled 233,615 MT. During December, Japan’s pork imports from the U.S. rose 7.2 percent over November to 23,058 MT. However, this was down 20.3 percent from December 2008. During 2009, Japan’s pork imports from the U.S. equaled 288,564 MT, 14.4 percent below 2008. The U.S. was the leading supplier of pork to Japan with 41.1 percent of the total imports. During December, Japan imported 16,544 MT of pork from Canada, which was up 13.3 percent over the previous month but was down 5.3 percent from December 2008. Japan’s total pork imports from Canada during 2009 were 1.3 percent lower than 2008, amounting to 172,253 MT. During 2009, Japan imported 122,916 MT of pork from Denmark. This was 23.1 percent less than 2008. Overall, Japan’s total pork imports during 2009 equaled 702,443 MT, 14.0 percent below 2008. Japan’s pork marketings during December equaled 150,386 MT, which was up 8.4 percent over the previous month and was up 1.4 percent over a year ago. Imported pork marketings totaled 65,609 MT, which was little changed from a year ago. Domestic pork marketings totaled 84,777 MT, 2.6 percent more than a year ago. At the end of December, Japan’s pork stocks totaled 166,978 MT, which was 2.3 percent less than the previous month and was 8.6 percent less than a year ago. Imported pork stocks totaled 137,422 MT, 11.9 percent lower than a year ago. Domestic pork stocks totaled 29,556 MT, 11.2 percent higher than a year ago.

Recently, the Korea International Trade Association (KITA) released January 2010 red meat import data for South Korea. According to the statistics, during January, South Korea imported 22,556 MT of beef. This was down 4.9 percent from the previous month but was up 17.9 percent over January 2009. More specifically, imports of frozen beef equaled 19,774 MT, which made up 87.7 percent of the total imports. Fresh, chilled beef imports equaled 2,783 MT. Beef imports from Australia during January fell 15.5 percent from the previous month to 11,738 MT. However, this was 14.2 percent higher than a year ago. Australia was the main beef import market for South Korea with 52.0 percent of the total. During January, South Korea imported 7,421 MT of beef from the U.S. This was 11.5 percent more than the previous month and was 47.4 percent more than a year ago. Beef imports from New Zealand during January totaled 3,137 MT, which was 4.7 percent higher than the previous month but was 10.2 percent lower than January 2009. In the meantime, during January, South Korea imported 25,634 MT of pork. Although this was 5.3 percent less than the previous month, it was 19.9 percent more than January 2009. Pork imports from the U.S. were 16.2 percent lower than the previous month but were 6.3 percent higher than a year ago, amounting to 7,326 MT. The U.S. was the leading pork import market for South Korea with 28.6 percent of the total. During January, South Korea imported 5,382 MT of pork from Canada. This was down 2.8 percent from the previous month but was up 18.1 percent over January 2009. Pork imports from Chile rose 18.3 percent over the previous month and 160.6 percent over January 2009 to 4,191 MT. To obtain additional data on South Korea’s markets, visit the KITA website at http://www.kita.org/.

South America

According to various news sources, as of March 13, the Argentina government, the Secretary for Internal Trade (SCI), banned all unprocessed beef exports, with the exception of Hilton cuts. It was later announced that Argentina’s customs would hold beef exports until the first week of April. However, the issuing of offal export certificates is also taking longer than normal. The SCI has a list of 13 beef cuts that are in high demand. These cuts will be sold at discounted prices by local retailers in order to supply cheap beef to consumers in Argentina.

Trade Highlights

The Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) recently published Livestock and Products Semi-annual 2010 report for Japan. The report includes beef and pork market outlooks for Japan. Also included is current production and supply data. The report can be found on the FAS website at http://www.fas.usda.gov/.

Recently, the USDA announced that the U.S. and China have reached an agreement to re-open China’s market to U.S. pork and pork products for the first time since mid-2009. According to the press release, 20 percent of U.S. pork production was exported in 2009. Prior to H1N1 trade restrictions, U.S. pork and pork variety meat exports to China were value at almost $275 million in 2008. To view the announcement, visit the FAS website at http://www.fas.usda.gov/

Further Reading

- You can view the full report by clicking here.

April 2010

Our Sponsors

Partners


Seasonal Picks

Meat Cuts and Muscle Foods - 2nd Edition